Josh Irby

Live from Sarajevo

What are you made for?

Last week I met a 19-year-old named Caleb who knows what he wants to do with his life.  When I meet someone who knows what they want out of life, I take note. Especially someone so young. I wish I knew what I wanted when I was a teenager.

I also paid attention because of what Caleb wants to do. He wants to be a funeral director.

Photo credit Ross Griff (Creative Commons)

Photo credit Ross Griff (Creative Commons)

When I was in high school we took an aptitude test designed to tell us what we were made for. The instructor told us to answer honestly. I did. My results came in. Funeral Director. I am not making this up.

So, when Caleb told me he wanted to be a funeral director, I turned our conversation into an impromptu interview. What I discovered confirmed the beauty and diversity of God’s creation.

One of Caleb’s friend died when he was younger. He remembers the funeral and how the family found comfort in the process. Afterwards he started looking for opportunities to attend other funerals—family friends, relatives, even distant acquaintances  He wanted to be there to comfort the family, if only by his presence.

Later, Caleb got a job at a funeral home. When he is there, he feels purposeful and, ironically, alive. It is an outlet for his naturally empathetic nature. He feels fulfilled helping someone through a difficult time in their life.

I left the conversation thinking, “Wow, we really are a diverse creation.” Each of us were made for something, we just need to find it.

For Caleb, it is standing beside a mourning family. For you, who knows. It is for you to discover.

What was the moment you discovered what you are made for? Let me know in the comments below.

 

[For a limited time, get my book about meaning and purpose, Meeting Miss Irby, for free at Story Cartel in exchange for your honest review.]

 

About Josh

  • i had a very similar conversation with a girl on campus this spring…same thing about wanting to be a funeral director. She felt alive working there and loved being able to come along side of people who were mourning because it was something tangible she could do.

    • Josh

      You have to love the diversity of God’s creation!